ADD: just a math function to me until a few years ago.

by Tina

Math was my favorite subject in school.  Yes, I was in the minority.  The challenge of the subject as well as knowing there was a definite answer intrigued me.  Oh, I did despise the word problems, and now I understand why.   When reading a math word problem, I had trouble comprehending the parts of the problem well enough to be able to calculate the answer without MUCH effort.

Even though some symptoms existed in elementary school, I wasn’t diagnosed with ADD until adulthood.  (I didn’t have the “typical” symptoms of ADD.)  No one in my family or among my close friends could believe it because of my doing well throughout school and having a successful career.  The truth is that no one actually knew the effort it took for me to get to the point I did in school or in my career.  And all that time, I thought I was doing what anyone else who was successful would do.  Until…

In college I began noticing that it took me MANY more hours of study and preparation than those making similar grades.  I also noticed that I had much anxiety when it came to some social settings.  Insecurity was my middle name; although, on the outside I just seemed to be a high achiever and a bookworm. 

Then in the corporate world as a CPA, I worked hours upon hours to get things accomplished.  One reason was that I had a difficult time working during the day when everyone was in the office.  Anytime someone passed my office door, I would look up.  I couldn’t sit at my desk very long without having to get up to walk around and would inevitably end up talking to someone.  Then when the office and the phone calmed down, I could hyperfocus like no one else.  (And no, the clients weren’t charged for all those hours I spent trying to work.) 

Once I was diagnosed with ADD, I began reading all I could find about the diagnosis.  I was a textbook case…well, almost.  I wasn’t as hyperactive as was usually described in the books.  It was easy for me to rationalize that my mind was actually where the hyperactivity occurred. 

Then I learned about the Inattentive type of ADD.  This is my textbook description.  It includes two of the key symptoms of ADD, which are inattention and impulsivity.  Also, included are possible symptoms such as:

  • trouble finalizing tasks once challenging parts are complete
  • making careless mistakes when dealing with boring or difficult tasks
  • difficulty maintaining attention during boring or difficult activities
  • difficulty concentrating on what someone is saying even if spoken to directly
  • avoiding or putting off projects that require organization
  • being distracted by surrounding noise or activity
  • having trouble remembering appointments or obligations

I never knew these were things others didn’t experience often; I thought these were all just part of life.

There are other symptom that I’ve learned clearly reflect my diagnosis.  Being highly sensitive emotionally as well as physically (smell, touch, noise, etc.) can be very challenging.  Energy fluctuations can be quite frustrating when the beginning of the day is productive yet uses enough energy that the remainder of the day is spent resting.  Having great ideas in size and importance yet not being able to carry them out can cause feelings of defeat.  Often expectations from others, and usually of ourselves, are much higher than we can accomplish in a given time, which can lead to feelings of shame and defeat.  

Yes, some of these challenges are experienced by many people.  When they begin to interfere with one’s day-to-day life, it could be time to consider whether or not ADD is the cause.  Some people consider ADD a gift, while others see it as a curse.  I believe ADD is what you make of it as are many aspects of life.  What say you?

{ 10 comments… read them below or add one }

Helen

What a great blog

Reply

Etsuko Choules

This article is really impressive. You’ve come to some really great conclusions and made valid points on this subject. Thank you for writing great content. I hope to see more.

Reply

Sachiko Christians

Would you mind if I shared this article on my webpage? I would certainly give you credit and a link back to your blog. Many thanks, and don’t hesitate to let me know here, or email me!

Reply

Tina

Hi, Sachiko.
Yes, you may share my posts on your site. I would appreciate your giving me credit by linking back to my site. Thanks for asking!
Tina

Reply

best acne treatment

woot, thankyou! I finally came to a site where the webmaster knows what they’re talking about. Do you know how many results are in Google when I search.. too many! It’s so annoying having to go from page after page after page, wasting my day away with thousands of people just copying eachother’s articles… bah. Anyway, thankyou very much for the info anyway, much appreciated.

Reply

Tina

Thanks so much for your encouraging words about my blog! I am so glad you find it helpful. Thanks for visiting! Keep watching for my blog challenge, which means I will be TRYING to post to my blog daily for the month of July!

Take care of you.
Tina

Reply

Kathy (Patterson) Scogin

Thanks so much for your blog – I find your perspective interesting. My middle daughter (12 yo) is also living with Inattentive ADD. While your struggles are what you personally experience – it gives me some insight into the frustrations my daughter has. It definitely is a challenge parenting a child with ADD who also faces the challenges of puberty.
I would be curious to know your thoughts on medications.

Reply

Tina

Hi, Kathy!

Thanks for your comments. I am so glad you visited my site and found the blog interesting and helpful.

It is usually does help one with ADD, as well as those who live with him or her, to hear the input and ideas of someone else who has ADD. Many situations can be reframed, so to speak, by a third party to make them easier to understand and to handle.

As to medications, there are so many points of view. Much depends on the individual who has ADD as well as discussions with his or her medical professional. There are also alternative methods of treating ADD that can be used with or without medication. I will be certain to discuss some of these in a blog soon.

Take care of you!
Tina

Reply

Joint pain relief

I dont know what to say. This blog is fantastic. Thats not really a really huge statement, but its all I could come up with after reading this. You know so much about this subject. So much so that you made me want to learn more about it. Your blog is my stepping stone, my friend. Thanks for the heads up on this subject.

Reply

Tina

Thanks so much for your comment. I hope you continue to visit the site!

Take care of you.
Tina

Reply

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: